How To Relax: A Bather’s Guide

In a world that seems to be spinning ever closer to destruction every single day, knowing how to relax may be the only important skill there is left. We cannot affect the looming political climate, which looms threatening whichever side of any cultural divide you happen to be on. We cannot affect climate change, the economy, or the cost of avocados. What we can do is learn how to recognise when our energy is being sapped by all of these things we can’t control and shut it all out to refresh our energies.

You can’t fight the good fight effectively (whether that’s political activism, or simply dealing with your morning commute or an unreasonable boss!) unless you stop sometimes to recharge your batteries and the cognoscenti know that one of the best ways to do that is with a long, hot soak in the bath.

You don’t have to have super deep tub surrounded by classic Edwardian Bathroom Fittings to relax in a bath – though that can’t hurt! Today we’re presenting a short guide to relaxing in the bath, whether you’re sceptical of the whole process or a committed and regular bather.

Time

One of the most important things you can do is make the time to take a proper bath. It’s true of all relaxation activities: we don’t treat our time with the same respect as we do during the working day. You wouldn’t compromise on an important, so when you’re taking the time to relax, whatever you’re doing, block it out and treat it with the same respect. You don’t have to tell people that you’re unavailable for two hours because you’re having a long bath, but you can tell people you’re not available, and stick to it.

Products

What really makes a bath is the product you put in it. A tub of hot water by itself is pleasant, but what allows you to really relax are the smells of bath bubble or the moisturising skin treatments contained in a bath bomb or bath oil.

There’s no single best solution here. You need to do a bit of research to find out what’s most relaxing for you: starting with some standard options is a good idea. A lavender scented bath bubble is uncontroversial but provides a good control. Any subsequent bath bombs, soaps or bodywashes can be measured against how that initial experience felt.

Once you’ve found the perfect product to add to the hot water, and mastered the ability to say ‘no’ so you can take the time you need, you’ll be well on the way to relaxation.

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